summaryrefslogtreecommitdiffstats
path: root/slackbook/html/network-configuration-hardware.html
diff options
context:
space:
mode:
Diffstat (limited to 'slackbook/html/network-configuration-hardware.html')
-rw-r--r--slackbook/html/network-configuration-hardware.html173
1 files changed, 0 insertions, 173 deletions
diff --git a/slackbook/html/network-configuration-hardware.html b/slackbook/html/network-configuration-hardware.html
deleted file mode 100644
index 99c2f283..00000000
--- a/slackbook/html/network-configuration-hardware.html
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,173 +0,0 @@
-<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
- "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
-<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
-<head>
-<meta name="generator" content="HTML Tidy, see www.w3.org" />
-<title>Network Hardware Configuration</title>
-<meta name="GENERATOR" content="Modular DocBook HTML Stylesheet Version 1.7" />
-<link rel="HOME" title="Slackware Linux Essentials" href="index.html" />
-<link rel="UP" title="Network Configuration" href="network-configuration.html" />
-<link rel="PREVIOUS" title="Network Configuration" href="network-configuration.html" />
-<link rel="NEXT" title="TCP/IP Configuration" href="network-configuration-tcpip.html" />
-<link rel="STYLESHEET" type="text/css" href="docbook.css" />
-<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
-</head>
-<body class="SECT1" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000" link="#0000FF" vlink="#840084"
-alink="#0000FF">
-<div class="NAVHEADER">
-<table summary="Header navigation table" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0"
-cellspacing="0">
-<tr>
-<th colspan="3" align="center">Slackware Linux Essentials</th>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td width="10%" align="left" valign="bottom"><a href="network-configuration.html"
-accesskey="P">Prev</a></td>
-<td width="80%" align="center" valign="bottom">Chapter 5 Network Configuration</td>
-<td width="10%" align="right" valign="bottom"><a href="network-configuration-tcpip.html"
-accesskey="N">Next</a></td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<hr align="LEFT" width="100%" />
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT1">
-<h1 class="SECT1"><a id="NETWORK-CONFIGURATION-HARDWARE"
-name="NETWORK-CONFIGURATION-HARDWARE">5.2 Network Hardware Configuration</a></h1>
-
-<p>Having decided that you wish to bring your Slackware machine on to some form of
-network, the first thing you'll need is a Linux-compatible network card. You will need to
-take a little care to ensure that the card is truly Linux-compatible (please refer to the
-Linux Documentation Project and/or the kernel documentation for information on the
-current status of your proposed network card). As a general rule, you will most likely be
-pleasantly surprised by the number of networking cards that are supported under the more
-modern kernels. Having said that, I'd still suggest referring to any of the various Linux
-hardware compatibility lists (such as <a
-href="http://www.eskimo.com/%7Elo/linux/hardwarelinks.html" target="_top">The GNU/Linux
-Beginners Group Hardware Compatibility Links</a> and <a
-href="http://www.linux.org/docs/ldp/howto/Hardware-HOWTO/" target="_top">The Linux
-Documentation Project Hardware HOWTO</a>) that are available on the Internet before
-purchasing your card. A little extra time spent in research can save days or even weeks
-trying to troubleshoot a card that isn't compatible with Linux at all.</p>
-
-<p>When you visit the Linux Hardware Compatibility lists available on the Internet, or
-when you refer to the kernel documentation installed on your machine, it would be wise to
-note which kernel module you'll need to use to support your network card.</p>
-
-<div class="SECT2">
-<h2 class="SECT2"><a id="NETWORK-CONFIGURATION-HARDWARE-MODULES"
-name="NETWORK-CONFIGURATION-HARDWARE-MODULES">5.2.1 Loading Network Modules</a></h2>
-
-<p>Kernel modules that are to be loaded on boot-up are loaded from the <tt
-class="FILENAME">rc.modules</tt> file in <tt class="FILENAME">/etc/rc.d</tt> or by the
-kernel's auto module loading started by <tt class="FILENAME">/etc/rc.d/rc.hotplug</tt>.
-The default <tt class="FILENAME">rc.modules</tt> file includes a Network device support
-section. If you open <tt class="FILENAME">rc.modules</tt> and look for that section,
-you'll notice that it first checks for an executable <tt
-class="FILENAME">rc.netdevice</tt> file in <tt class="FILENAME">/etc/rc.d/</tt>. This
-script is created if <tt class="COMMAND">setup</tt> successfully autoprobes your network
-device during installation.</p>
-
-<p>Below that &#8220;if&#8221; block is a list of network devices and modprobe lines,
-each commented out. Find your device and uncomment the corresponding modprobe line, then
-save the file. Running <tt class="FILENAME">rc.modules</tt> as <tt
-class="USERNAME">root</tt> should now load your network device driver (as well as any
-other modules that are listed and uncommented). Note that some modules (such as the
-ne2000 driver) require parameters; make sure you select the correct line.</p>
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT2">
-<h2 class="SECT2"><a id="NETWORK-CONFIGURATION-HARDWARE-LAN"
-name="NETWORK-CONFIGURATION-HARDWARE-LAN">5.2.2 LAN (10/100/1000Base-T and Base-2)
-cards</a></h2>
-
-<p>This heading encompasses all of the internal PCI and ISA networking cards. Drivers for
-these cards are provided via loadable kernel modules as covered in the previous
-paragraph. <tt class="FILENAME">/sbin/netconfig</tt> should have probed for your card and
-successfully set up your <tt class="FILENAME">rc.netdevice</tt> file. If this did not
-occur, the most likely problem would be that the module that you're attempting to load
-for a given card is incorrect (it is not unheard of for different generations of the same
-brand of card from the same manufacturer to require different modules). If you are
-certain that the module that you're attempting to load is the correct one, your next best
-bet would be to refer to the documentation for the module in an attempt to discover
-whether or not specific parameters are required during when the module is
-initialized.</p>
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT2">
-<h2 class="SECT2"><a id="NETWORK-CONFIGURATION-HARDWARE-MODEMS"
-name="NETWORK-CONFIGURATION-HARDWARE-MODEMS">5.2.3 Modems</a></h2>
-
-<p>Like LAN cards, modems can come with various bus support options. Until recently, most
-modems were 8 or 16 bit ISA cards. With the efforts of Intel and motherboard
-manufacturers everywhere to finally kill off the ISA bus completely, it is common now to
-find that most modems are either external modems that connect to a serial or USB port or
-are internal PCI modems. If you wish for your modem to work with Linux, it is <span
-class="emphasis"><i class="EMPHASIS">VITALLY</i></span> important to research your
-prospective modem purchase, particularly if you are considering purchasing a PCI modem.
-Many, if not most, PCI modems available on store shelves these days are WinModems.
-WinModems lack some basic hardware on the modem card itself: the functions performed by
-this hardware are typically offloaded onto the CPU by the modem driver and the Windows
-operating system. This means that they do not have the standard serial interface that
-PPPD will be expecting to see when you try to dial out to your Internet Service
-Provider.</p>
-
-<p>If you want to be absolutely sure that the modem you're purchasing will work with
-Linux, purchase an external hardware modem that connects to the serial port on your PC.
-These are guaranteed to work better and be less trouble to install and maintain, though
-they require external power and tend to cost more.</p>
-
-<p>There are several web sites that provide drivers and assistance for configuring
-WinModem based devices. Some users have reported success configuring and installing
-drivers for the various winmodems, including Lucent, Conexant, and Rockwell chipsets. As
-the required software for these devices is not an included part of Slackware, and varies
-from driver to driver, we will not go into detail on them.</p>
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT2">
-<h2 class="SECT2"><a id="NETWORK-CONFIGURATION-HARDWARE-PCMCIA"
-name="NETWORK-CONFIGURATION-HARDWARE-PCMCIA">5.2.4 PCMCIA</a></h2>
-
-<p>As part of your Slackware install, you are given the opportunity to install the pcmcia
-package (in the &#8220;A&#8221; series of packages). This package contains the
-applications and setup files required to work with PCMCIA cards under Slackware. It is
-important to note that the pcmcia package only installs the generic software required to
-work with PCMCIA cards under Slackware. It does NOT install any drivers or modules. The
-available modules and drivers will be in the <tt class="FILENAME">/lib/modules/`uname
--r`/pcmcia</tt> directory. You may need to do some experimentation to find a module that
-will work with your network card.</p>
-
-<p>You will need to edit <tt class="FILENAME">/etc/pcmcia/network.opts</tt> (for an
-Ethernet card) or <tt class="FILENAME">/etc/pcmcia/wireless.opts</tt> (if you have a
-wireless networking card). Like most Slackware configuration files, these two files are
-very well commented and it should be easy to determine which modifications need to be
-made.</p>
-</div>
-</div>
-
-<div class="NAVFOOTER">
-<hr align="LEFT" width="100%" />
-<table summary="Footer navigation table" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0"
-cellspacing="0">
-<tr>
-<td width="33%" align="left" valign="top"><a href="network-configuration.html"
-accesskey="P">Prev</a></td>
-<td width="34%" align="center" valign="top"><a href="index.html"
-accesskey="H">Home</a></td>
-<td width="33%" align="right" valign="top"><a href="network-configuration-tcpip.html"
-accesskey="N">Next</a></td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td width="33%" align="left" valign="top">Network Configuration</td>
-<td width="34%" align="center" valign="top"><a href="network-configuration.html"
-accesskey="U">Up</a></td>
-<td width="33%" align="right" valign="top">TCP/IP Configuration</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-</div>
-</body>
-</html>
-