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-<title>Booting</title>
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-<tr>
-<th colspan="3" align="center">Slackware Linux Essentials</th>
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-accesskey="P">Prev</a></td>
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-
-<div class="CHAPTER">
-<h1><a id="BOOTING" name="BOOTING"></a>Chapter 7 Booting</h1>
-
-<div class="TOC">
-<dl>
-<dt><b>Table of Contents</b></dt>
-
-<dt>7.1 <a href="booting.html#BOOTING-LILO">LILO</a></dt>
-
-<dt>7.2 <a href="booting-loadlin.html">LOADLIN</a></dt>
-
-<dt>7.3 <a href="booting-dual.html">Dual Booting</a></dt>
-</dl>
-</div>
-
-<p>The process of booting your Linux system can sometimes be easy and sometimes be
-difficult. Many users install Slackware on their computer and that's it. They just turn
-it on and it's ready to use. Othertimes, simply booting the machine can be a chore. For
-most users, LILO works best. Slackware includes LILO and Loadlin for booting Slackware
-Linux. LILO will work from a hard drive partition, a hard drive's master boot record, or
-a floppy disk, making it a very versatile tool. Loadlin works from a DOS command line,
-killing DOS and invoking Linux.</p>
-
-<p>Another popular utility for booting Linux is GRUB. GRUB is not included or officially
-supported by Slackware. Slackware holds to the &#8220;tried and true&#8221; standard for
-what gets included inside the distribution. While GRUB works well and includes some
-features that LILO does not, LILO handles all the essential tasks of a boot loader
-reliably with a proven track record. Being younger, GRUB hasn't quite lived up to that
-legacy yet. As it is not included with Slackware, we do not discuss it here. If you wish
-to use GRUB (perhaps it came with another Linux OS and you want to use it to dual-boot)
-consult GRUB's documentation.</p>
-
-<p>This section covers using LILO and Loadlin, the two booters included with Slackware.
-It also explains some typical dual booting scenarios and how you could go about setting
-it up.</p>
-
-<div class="SECT1">
-<h1 class="SECT1"><a id="BOOTING-LILO" name="BOOTING-LILO">7.1 LILO</a></h1>
-
-<p>The Linux Loader, or LILO, is the most popular booter in use on Linux systems. It is
-quite configurable and can easily be used to boot other operating systems.</p>
-
-<p>Slackware Linux comes with a menu-driven configuration utility called <tt
-class="COMMAND">liloconfig</tt>. This program is first run during the setup process, but
-you can invoke it later by typing <tt class="COMMAND">liloconfig</tt> at the prompt.</p>
-
-<p>LILO reads its settings from the <tt class="COMMAND">/etc/lilo.conf</tt>(5) file. It
-is not read each time you boot up, but instead is read each time you install LILO. LILO
-must be reinstalled to the boot sector each time you make a configuration change. Many
-LILO errors come from making changes to the <tt class="FILENAME">lilo.conf</tt> file, but
-failing to re-run lilo to install these changes. <tt class="COMMAND">liloconfig</tt> will
-help you build the configuration file so that you can install LILO for your system. If
-you prefer to edit <tt class="FILENAME">/etc/lilo.conf</tt> by hand, then reinstalling
-LILO just involves typing <tt class="COMMAND">/sbin/lilo</tt> (as <tt
-class="USERNAME">root</tt>) at the prompt.</p>
-
-<p>When you first invoke <tt class="COMMAND">liloconfig</tt>, it will look like this:</p>
-
-<div class="FIGURE"><a id="BOOTING-SETUP-LILO" name="BOOTING-SETUP-LILO"></a>
-<p><b>Figure 7-1. <tt class="COMMAND">liloconfig</tt></b></p>
-
-<p><img src="booting/setup-lilo-w.png" /></p>
-</div>
-
-<p>If this is your first time setting up LILO, you should pick simple. Otherwise, you
-might find expert to be faster if you are familiar with LILO and Linux. Selecting simple
-will begin the LILO configuration.</p>
-
-<p>If kernel frame buffer support is compiled into your kernel, <tt
-class="COMMAND">liloconfig</tt> will ask which video resolution you would like to use.
-This is the resolution that is also used by the XFree86 frame buffer server. If you do
-not want the console to run in a special video mode, selecting normal will keep the
-standard 80x25 text mode in use.</p>
-
-<p>The next part of the LILO configuration is selecting where you want it installed. This
-is probably the most important step. The list below explains the installation places:</p>
-
-<div class="VARIABLELIST">
-<dl>
-<dt><var class="OPTION">Root</var></dt>
-
-<dd>
-<p>This option installs LILO to the beginning of your Linux root partition. This is the
-safest option if you have other operating systems on your computer. It ensures that any
-other booters are not overwritten. The disadvantage is that LILO will only load from here
-if your Linux drive is the first drive on your system. This is why many people chose to
-create a very small <tt class="FILENAME">/boot</tt> partition as the first drive on their
-system. This allows the kernel and LILO to be installed at the beginning of the drive
-where LILO can find them. Previous versions of LILO contained an infamous flaw known as
-the &#8220;1024 cylinder limit&#8221;. LILO was unable to boot kernels on partitions past
-the 1024th cylinder. Recent editions of LILO have eliminated this problem.</p>
-</dd>
-
-<dt><var class="OPTION">Floppy</var></dt>
-
-<dd>
-<p>This method is even safer than the previous one. It creates a boot floppy that you can
-use to boot your Linux system. This keeps the booter off the hard disk entirely, so you
-only boot this floppy when you want to use Slackware. The flaws with this method are
-obvious. Floppies are notoriously fickle, prone to failures. Secondly, the boot loader is
-no longer self-contained within the computer. If you loose your floppy disk, you'll have
-to make another to boot your system.</p>
-</dd>
-
-<dt><var class="OPTION">MBR</var></dt>
-
-<dd>
-<p>You will want to use this method if Slackware is the only operating system on your
-computer, or if you will be using LILO to choose between multiple operating systems on
-your computer. This is the most preferred method for installing LILO and will work with
-almost any computer system.</p>
-
-<div class="WARNING">
-<table class="WARNING" width="90%" border="0">
-<tr>
-<td width="25" align="CENTER" valign="TOP"><img src="./imagelib/admon/warning.png"
-hspace="5" alt="Warning" /></td>
-<td align="LEFT" valign="TOP">
-<p>This option will overwrite any other booter you have in the MBR.</p>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-</div>
-</dd>
-</dl>
-</div>
-
-<p>After selecting the installation location, <tt class="COMMAND">liloconfig</tt> will
-write the configuration file and install LILO. That's it. If you select the expert mode
-you will receive a special menu. This menu allows you to tweak the <tt
-class="FILENAME">/etc/lilo.conf</tt> file, add other operating systems to your boot menu,
-and set LILO to pass special kernel parameters at boot time. The expert menu looks like
-this:</p>
-
-<div class="FIGURE"><a id="BOOTING-LILO-EXPERT" name="BOOTING-LILO-EXPERT"></a>
-<p><b>Figure 7-2. <tt class="COMMAND">liloconfig</tt> Expert Menu</b></p>
-
-<p><img src="booting/setup-lilo-expert-w.png" /></p>
-</div>
-
-<p>Whatever your system configuration is, setting up a working boot loader is easy. <tt
-class="COMMAND">liloconfig</tt> makes setting it up a cinch.</p>
-</div>
-</div>
-
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