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-<meta name="generator" content="HTML Tidy, see www.w3.org" />
-<title>Dual Booting</title>
-<meta name="GENERATOR" content="Modular DocBook HTML Stylesheet Version 1.7" />
-<link rel="HOME" title="Slackware Linux Essentials" href="index.html" />
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-<div class="NAVHEADER">
-<table summary="Header navigation table" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0"
-cellspacing="0">
-<tr>
-<th colspan="3" align="center">Slackware Linux Essentials</th>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td width="10%" align="left" valign="bottom"><a href="booting-loadlin.html"
-accesskey="P">Prev</a></td>
-<td width="80%" align="center" valign="bottom">Chapter 7 Booting</td>
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-accesskey="N">Next</a></td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<hr align="LEFT" width="100%" />
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT1">
-<h1 class="SECT1"><a id="BOOTING-DUAL" name="BOOTING-DUAL">7.3 Dual Booting</a></h1>
-
-<p>Many users set up their computers to boot Slackware Linux and another operating
-system. We've described several typical dual boot scenarios below, in case you are having
-difficulty setting up your system.</p>
-
-<div class="SECT2">
-<h2 class="SECT2"><a id="BOOTING-DUAL-WINDOWS" name="BOOTING-DUAL-WINDOWS">7.3.1
-Windows</a></h2>
-
-<p>Setting up a computer with both MS Windows and Linux is probably the most common dual
-boot scenario. There are numerous ways you can setup the booting, but this section will
-cover two.</p>
-
-<p>Often times when setting up a dual boot system, a person will devise a perfect plan
-for where everything should go but mess up the installation order. It is very important
-to understand that operating systems need to be installed in a certain order for a dual
-boot setup to work. Linux always offers control over what, if anything, gets written to
-the Master Boot Record. Therefore, it's always advisable to install Linux last. Windows
-should be installed first, since it will always write its booter to the Master Boot
-Record, overwriting any entry Linux may have put there.</p>
-
-<div class="SECT3">
-<h3 class="SECT3"><a id="AEN2577" name="AEN2577">7.3.1.1 Using LILO</a></h3>
-
-<p>Most people will want to use LILO to chose between Linux and Windows. As stated above,
-you should install Windows first, then Linux.</p>
-
-<p>Let's say you have a 40GB IDE hard disk as the only drive in your system. Let's also
-say that you want to give half of that space to Windows and half of that space to Linux.
-This will present a problem when trying to boot Linux.</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="PROGRAMLISTING">
- 20GB Windows boot (C:)
- 1GB Linux root (/)
- 19GB Linux /usr (/usr)
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>You would also want to set aside an adequate amount of space for a Linux swap
-partition. The unwritten rule is to use twice the amount of RAM you have in disk space. A
-64MB system would have 128MB of swap, and so on. Adequate swap space is the discussion of
-many flames on IRC and Usenet. There's no truly &#8220;right&#8221; way to do it, but
-sticking with the rule above should be sufficient.</p>
-
-<p>With your partitions laid out, you should proceed to install Windows. After that is
-set up and working, you should install Linux. The LILO installation needs special
-attention. You will want to select the expert mode for installing LILO.</p>
-
-<p>Begin a new LILO configuration. You will want to install it to Master Boot Record so
-that it can be used to choose between the two operating systems. From the menu, add your
-Linux partition and add your Windows (or DOS) partition. Once that's complete, you can
-install LILO.</p>
-
-<p>Reboot the computer. LILO should load and will display a menu letting you select
-between the operating systems you have installed. Select the name of the OS you wish to
-load (these names were selected when you setup LILO).</p>
-
-<p>LILO is quite a configurable boot loader. It's not just limited to booting Linux or
-DOS. It can boot just about anything. The man pages for <tt class="COMMAND">lilo</tt>(8)
-and <tt class="FILENAME">lilo.conf</tt>(5) provide more detailed information.</p>
-
-<p>What if LILO doesn't work? There are instances where LILO just won't work on a
-particular machine. Fortunately, there is another way to dual boot Linux and Windows.</p>
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT3">
-<h3 class="SECT3"><a id="AEN2591" name="AEN2591">7.3.1.2 Using LOADLIN</a></h3>
-
-<p>This method can be used if LILO doesn't work on your system, or if you just don't want
-to set up LILO. This method is also ideal for the user that reinstalls Windows often.
-Each time you reinstall Windows, it will overwrite the Master Boot Record, thus
-destroying any LILO installation. With LOADLIN, you are not subject to that problem. The
-biggest disadvantage is that you can only use LOADLIN to boot Linux.</p>
-
-<p>With LOADLIN, you can install the operating systems in any order desired. Be careful
-about installing things to the Master Boot Record, you do not want to do that. LOADLIN
-relies on the Windows partition being bootable. So during the Slackware installation,
-make sure you skip the LILO setup.</p>
-
-<p>After installing the operating systems, copy the <tt class="FILENAME">loadlin<var
-class="REPLACEABLE">X</var>.zip</tt> (where <var class="REPLACEABLE">X</var> is a version
-number, such as <var class="LITERAL">16a</var>) file from root's home directory to your
-Windows partition. Also copy your kernel image to the Windows partition. You will need to
-be in Linux for this to work. This example shows how to do this:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">#</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">mkdir /win</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">#</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /win</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">#</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">mkdir /win/linux</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">#</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">cd /root</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">#</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">cp loadlin* /win/linux</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">#</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">cp /boot/vmlinuz /win/linux</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">#</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">cd /win/linuz</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">#</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">unzip loadlin16a.zip</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>That will create a <tt class="FILENAME">C:\LINUX</tt> directory on your Windows
-partition (assuming it's <tt class="FILENAME">/dev/hda1</tt>) and copy over the necessary
-stuff for LOADLIN. After doing this, you will need to reboot into Windows to setup a boot
-menu.</p>
-
-<p>Once in Windows, get to a DOS prompt. First, we need to make sure the system is set to
-not boot into the graphical interface.</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-C:\&#62; <kbd class="USERINPUT">cd \</kbd>
-C:\&#62; <kbd class="USERINPUT">attrib -r -a -s -h MSDOS.SYS</kbd>
-C:\&#62; <kbd class="USERINPUT">edit MSDOS.SYS</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>Add this line to the file:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="PROGRAMLISTING">
-BootGUI=0
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>Now save the file and exit the editor. Now edit <tt
-class="FILENAME">C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT</tt> so we can add a boot menu. The following provides
-an example of what a boot menu block in <tt class="FILENAME">AUTOEXEC.BAT</tt> would look
-like:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="PROGRAMLISTING">
-cls
-echo System Boot Menu
-echo.
-echo 1 - Linux
-echo 2 - Windows
-echo.
-choice /c:12 "Selection? -&#62; "
-if errorlevel 2 goto WIN
-if errorlevel 1 goto LINUX
-:LINUX
-cls
-echo "Starting Linux..."
-cd \linux
-loadlin c:\linux\vmlinuz root=/dev/hda2 ro
-goto END
-:WIN
-cls
-echo "Starting Windows..."
-win
-goto END
-:END
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>The key line is the one that runs LOADLIN. We tell it the kernel to load, the Linux
-root partition, and that we want it mounted read-only initially.</p>
-
-<p>The tools for these two methods are provided with Slackware Linux. There are numerous
-other booters on the market, but these should work for most dual boot setups.</p>
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT3">
-<h3 class="SECT3"><a id="AEN2633" name="AEN2633">7.3.1.3 Deprecated Windows NT
-Hack</a></h3>
-
-<p>This is the least common dual booting situation. In the days of old, LILO was unable
-to boot Windows NT, requiring Linux users to hack NTLDR, which presented several more
-problems than dual booting between Windows 9x and Linux. Understand that the following
-instructions are deprecated. LILO has been able to boot Windows NT/2000/XP/2003 for many
-years now. If you are using a legacy machine though, you may need to use just such a
-hack.</p>
-
-<ol type="1">
-<li>
-<p>Install Windows NT</p>
-</li>
-
-<li>
-<p>Install Linux, making sure LILO is installed to the superblock of the Linux
-partition</p>
-</li>
-
-<li>
-<p>Get the first 512 bytes of the Linux root partition and store it on the Windows NT
-partition</p>
-</li>
-
-<li>
-<p>Edit <tt class="FILENAME">C:\BOOT.INI</tt> under Windows NT to add a Linux option</p>
-</li>
-</ol>
-
-<p>Installing Windows NT should be fairly straightforward, as should installing Linux.
-From there, it gets a little more tricky. Grabbing the first 512 bytes of the Linux
-partition is easier than it sounds. You will need to be in Linux to accomplish this.
-Assuming your Linux partition is <tt class="FILENAME">/dev/hda2</tt>, issue this
-command:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">#</samp> <kbd
-class="USERINPUT">dd if=/dev/hda2 of=/tmp/bootsect.lnx bs=1 count=512</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>That's it. Now you need to copy bootsect.lnx to the Windows NT partition. Here's where
-we run into another problem. Linux does not have stable write support for the NTFS
-filesystem. If you installed Windows NT and formatted your drive as NTFS, you will need
-to copy this file to a FAT floppy and then read from it under Windows NT. If you
-formatted the Windows NT drive as FAT, you can simply mount it under Linux and copy the
-file over. Either way, you will want to get <tt class="FILENAME">/tmp/bootsect.lnx</tt>
-from the Linux drive to <tt class="FILENAME">C:\BOOTSECT.LNX</tt> on the Windows NT
-drive.</p>
-
-<p>The last step is adding a menu option to the Windows NT boot menu. Under Windows NT
-open a command prompt.</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-C:\WINNT&#62; <kbd class="USERINPUT">cd \</kbd>
-C:\&#62; <kbd class="USERINPUT">attrib -r -a -s -h boot.ini</kbd>
-C:\&#62; <kbd class="USERINPUT">edit boot.ini</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>Add this line to the end of the file:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="PROGRAMLISTING">
-C:\bootsect.lnx="Slackware Linux"
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>Save the changes and exit the editor. When you reboot Windows NT, you will have a
-Linux option on the menu. Choosing it will boot into Linux.</p>
-</div>
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT2">
-<h2 class="SECT2"><a id="BOOTING-DUAL-LINUX" name="BOOTING-DUAL-LINUX">7.3.2
-Linux</a></h2>
-
-<p>Yes, people really do this. This is definitely the easiest dual boot scenario. You can
-simply use LILO and add more entries to the <tt class="FILENAME">/etc/lilo.conf</tt>
-file. That's all there is to it.</p>
-</div>
-</div>
-
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