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author Patrick J Volkerding <volkerdi@slackware.com>2018-05-25 23:29:36 +0000
committer Eric Hameleers <alien@slackware.com>2018-06-01 00:36:01 +0200
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tree228b0735896af90ca78151c9a69aa3efd12c8cae /slackbook/html/installation-partitioning.html
parentd31c50870d0bee042ce660e445c9294a59a3a65b (diff)
downloadcurrent-14.2.tar.gz
current-14.2.tar.xz
Fri May 25 23:29:36 UTC 201814.2
patches/packages/glibc-zoneinfo-2018e-noarch-2_slack14.2.txz: Rebuilt. Handle removal of US/Pacific-New timezone. If we see that the machine is using this, it will be automatically switched to US/Pacific.
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-
-<div class="SECT1">
-<h1 class="SECT1"><a id="INSTALLATION-PARTITIONING" name="INSTALLATION-PARTITIONING">3.3
-Partitioning</a></h1>
-
-<p>After booting from your preferred media, you will need to partition your hard disk.
-The disk partition is where the Linux filesystem will be created and is where Slackware
-will be installed. At the very minimum we recommend creating two partitions; one for your
-root filesystem (<tt class="FILENAME">/</tt>) and one for swap space.</p>
-
-<p>After the root disk finishes loading, it will present you with a login prompt. Log in
-as root (there is no password). At the shell prompt, run either <tt
-class="COMMAND">cfdisk</tt>(8) or <tt class="COMMAND">fdisk</tt>(8). The <tt
-class="COMMAND">cfdisk</tt> program provides a more user-friendly interface than the
-regular <tt class="COMMAND">fdisk</tt> program, but does lack some features. We will
-briefly explain the <tt class="COMMAND">fdisk</tt> program below.</p>
-
-<p>Begin by running <tt class="COMMAND">fdisk</tt> for your hard disk. In Linux, the hard
-disks do not have drive letters, but are represented by a file. The first IDE hard disk
-(primary master) is <tt class="FILENAME">/dev/hda</tt>, the primary slave is <tt
-class="FILENAME">/dev/hdb</tt>, and so on. SCSI disks follow the same type system, but
-are in the form of <tt class="FILENAME">/dev/sd<var class="REPLACEABLE">X</var></tt>. You
-will need to start <tt class="COMMAND">fdisk</tt> and pass it your hard disk:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">#</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">fdisk /dev/hda</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>Like all good Unix programs, <tt class="COMMAND">fdisk</tt> gives you a prompt
-(thought you were getting a menu, right?). The first thing you should do is examine your
-current partitions. We do that by typing <kbd class="USERINPUT">p</kbd> at the <tt
-class="COMMAND">fdisk</tt> prompt:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-Command (m for help): <kbd class="USERINPUT">p</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>This will display all sorts of information about your current partitions. Most people
-pick a free drive to install to and then remove any existing partitions on it to create
-room for the Linux partitions.</p>
-
-<div class="WARNING">
-<table class="WARNING" width="100%" border="0">
-<tr>
-<td width="25" align="CENTER" valign="TOP"><img src="./imagelib/admon/warning.png"
-hspace="5" alt="Warning" /></td>
-<td align="LEFT" valign="TOP">
-<p>IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT YOU BACK UP ANY INFORMATION YOU WANT TO SAVE BEFORE
-DESTROYING THE PARTITION IT LIVES ON.</p>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-</div>
-
-<p>There is no easy way to recover from deleting a partition, so always back up before
-playing with them.</p>
-
-<p>Looking at the table of partition information you should see a partition number, the
-size of the partition, and its type. There's more information, but don't worry about that
-for now. We are going to delete all of the partitions on this drive to create the Linux
-ones. We run the <kbd class="USERINPUT">d</kbd> command to delete those:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-Command (m for help): <kbd class="USERINPUT">d</kbd>
-Partition number (1-4): <kbd class="USERINPUT">1</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>This process should be continued for each of the partitions. After deleting the
-partitions we are ready to create the Linux ones. We have decided to create one partition
-for our root filesystem and one for swap. It is worth noting that Unix partitioning
-schemes are the subject of many flame wars, and that most users will tell you the best
-way to do it. At a minimum, you should create one partition for <tt
-class="FILENAME">/</tt> and one for swap. Over time, you'll develop a method that works
-well for you.</p>
-
-<p>I use two basic partition schemes. The first is for a desktop. I make 4 partitions,
-<tt class="FILENAME">/</tt>, <tt class="FILENAME">/home</tt>, <tt
-class="FILENAME">/usr/local</tt>, and swap. This lets me re-install or upgrade the entire
-installation under <tt class="FILENAME">/</tt> without wiping out my data files under
-/home or my custom compiled applications under <tt class="FILENAME">/usr/local</tt>. For
-servers, I often replace the <tt class="FILENAME">/usr/local</tt> partition with a <tt
-class="FILENAME">/var</tt> partition. Many different servers store information on that
-partition and having it kept separate from <tt class="FILENAME">/</tt> has certain
-performance benefits. For now, we're sticking with just two partitions: <tt
-class="FILENAME">/</tt> and swap.</p>
-
-<p>Now we create the partitions with the <kbd class="USERINPUT">n</kbd> command:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-Command (m for help): <kbd class="USERINPUT">n</kbd>
-Command action
- e extended
- p primary partition (1-4)
-<kbd class="USERINPUT">p</kbd>
-Partition number (1-4):<kbd class="USERINPUT">1</kbd>
-First cylinder (0-1060, default 0):<kbd class="USERINPUT">0</kbd>
- Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (0-1060, default 1060):<kbd
-class="USERINPUT">+64M</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>You need to make sure you create primary partitions. The first partition is going to
-be our swap partition. We tell fdisk to make partition number 1 a primary partition. We
-start it at cylinder 0 and for the ending cylinder we type +64M. This will give us a 64
-megabyte partition for swap. (The size of the swap partition you need actually depends on
-the amount of RAM you have. It is conventional wisdom that a swap space double the size
-of your RAM should be created.) Then we define primary partition number 2 starting at the
-first available cylinder and going all the way to the end of the drive.</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-Command (m for help):<kbd class="USERINPUT">n</kbd>
-Command action
- e extended
- p primary partition (1-4)
-<kbd class="USERINPUT">p</kbd>
-Partition number (1-4):<kbd class="USERINPUT">2</kbd>
-First cylinder (124-1060, default 124):<kbd class="USERINPUT">124</kbd>
-Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (124-1060, default 1060):<kbd
-class="USERINPUT">1060</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>We are almost done. We need to change the type of the first partition to type 82
-(Linux swap). Type <kbd class="USERINPUT">t</kbd> to change the type, select the first
-partition, and type <var class="LITERAL">82</var>. Before writing your changes to the
-disk, you should look at the new partition table one last time. Use the <kbd
-class="USERINPUT">p</kbd> in <tt class="COMMAND">fdisk</tt> to display the partition
-table. If everything looks good, type <kbd class="USERINPUT">w</kbd> to write your
-changes to the disk and quit <tt class="COMMAND">fdisk</tt>.</p>
-</div>
-
-<div class="NAVFOOTER">
-<hr align="LEFT" width="100%" />
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-<tr>
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