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author Patrick J Volkerding <volkerdi@slackware.com>2018-05-25 23:29:36 +0000
committer Eric Hameleers <alien@slackware.com>2018-06-01 00:36:01 +0200
commit39366733c3fe943363566756e2e152c45a1b3cb2 (patch)
tree228b0735896af90ca78151c9a69aa3efd12c8cae /slackbook/html/help.html
parentd31c50870d0bee042ce660e445c9294a59a3a65b (diff)
downloadcurrent-14.2.tar.gz
current-14.2.tar.xz
Fri May 25 23:29:36 UTC 201814.2
patches/packages/glibc-zoneinfo-2018e-noarch-2_slack14.2.txz: Rebuilt. Handle removal of US/Pacific-New timezone. If we see that the machine is using this, it will be automatically switched to US/Pacific.
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-<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
- "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
-<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
-<head>
-<meta name="generator" content="HTML Tidy, see www.w3.org" />
-<title>Help</title>
-<meta name="GENERATOR" content="Modular DocBook HTML Stylesheet Version 1.7" />
-<link rel="HOME" title="Slackware Linux Essentials" href="index.html" />
-<link rel="PREVIOUS" title="Open Source and Free Software"
-href="introduction-opensource.html" />
-<link rel="NEXT" title="Online Help" href="help-online.html" />
-<link rel="STYLESHEET" type="text/css" href="docbook.css" />
-<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
-</head>
-<body class="CHAPTER" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000" link="#0000FF" vlink="#840084"
-alink="#0000FF">
-<div class="NAVHEADER">
-<table summary="Header navigation table" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0"
-cellspacing="0">
-<tr>
-<th colspan="3" align="center">Slackware Linux Essentials</th>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td width="10%" align="left" valign="bottom"><a href="introduction-opensource.html"
-accesskey="P">Prev</a></td>
-<td width="80%" align="center" valign="bottom"></td>
-<td width="10%" align="right" valign="bottom"><a href="help-online.html"
-accesskey="N">Next</a></td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<hr align="LEFT" width="100%" />
-</div>
-
-<div class="CHAPTER">
-<h1><a id="HELP" name="HELP"></a>Chapter 2 Help</h1>
-
-<div class="TOC">
-<dl>
-<dt><b>Table of Contents</b></dt>
-
-<dt>2.1 <a href="help.html#HELP-SYSTEM">System Help</a></dt>
-
-<dt>2.2 <a href="help-online.html">Online Help</a></dt>
-</dl>
-</div>
-
-<p>Often there are times when you might need help with a specific command, setting up a
-program, or getting a piece of hardware to work. Maybe you simply want to understand a
-given command better, or see what other options are available to use with it. Luckily,
-there are a variety of ways that you can get the help you're looking for. When you
-install Slackware you have the option of installing packages from the &#8220;F&#8221;
-series which includes FAQs and HOWTOs. Programs also come with help about their options,
-configuration files, and usage.</p>
-
-<div class="SECT1">
-<h1 class="SECT1"><a id="HELP-SYSTEM" name="HELP-SYSTEM">2.1 System Help</a></h1>
-
-<div class="SECT2">
-<h2 class="SECT2"><a id="HELP-SYSTEM-MAN" name="HELP-SYSTEM-MAN">2.1.1 <tt
-class="COMMAND">man</tt></a></h2>
-
-<p>The <tt class="COMMAND">man</tt> command (short for &#8220;manual&#8221;) is the
-traditional form of online documentation in Unix and Linux operating systems. Comprised
-of specially formatted files, the &#8220;man pages&#8221;, are written for the vast
-majority of commands and are distributed with the software itself. Executing <tt
-class="COMMAND">man somecommand</tt> will display the man page for (naturally) the
-command specified, in our example this would be the imaginary program <tt
-class="COMMAND">somecommand</tt>.</p>
-
-<p>As you might imagine, the amount of man pages can quickly add up, becoming overly
-confusing and seriously complicated, even for an advanced user. So, for this reason, man
-pages are grouped into enumerated sections. This system has been around for a very long
-time; enough so that you will often see commands, programs, and even programming library
-functions referred to with their man section number.</p>
-
-<p>For example:</p>
-
-<p>You might see a reference to <tt class="COMMAND">man</tt>(1). The numbering tells you
-that &#8220;<tt class="COMMAND">man</tt>&#8221; is documented in section 1 (user
-commands); you can specify that you want the section 1 man page for &#8220;man&#8221;
-with the command <tt class="COMMAND">man 1 man</tt>. Specifying the section that man
-should look in is useful in the case of multiple items with the same name.</p>
-
-<div class="TABLE"><a id="AEN409" name="AEN409"></a>
-<p><b>Table 2-1. Man Page Sections</b></p>
-
-<table border="0" frame="void" width="100%" class="CALSTABLE">
-<col width="25%" />
-<col width="75%" />
-<thead>
-<tr>
-<th>Section</th>
-<th>Contents</th>
-</tr>
-</thead>
-
-<tbody>
-<tr>
-<td>Section 1</td>
-<td>user commands (intro only)</td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td>Section 2</td>
-<td>system calls</td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td>Section 3</td>
-<td>C library calls</td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td>Section 4</td>
-<td>devices (e.g., <tt class="FILENAME">hd</tt>, <tt class="FILENAME">sd</tt>)</td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td>Section 5</td>
-<td>file formats and protocols (e.g., wtmp, <tt class="FILENAME">/etc/passwd</tt>,
-nfs)</td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td>Section 6</td>
-<td>games (intro only)</td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td>Section 7</td>
-<td>conventions, macro packages, etc. (e.g., nroff, ascii)</td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td>Section 8</td>
-<td>system administration (intro only)</td>
-</tr>
-</tbody>
-</table>
-</div>
-
-<p>In addition to <tt class="COMMAND">man</tt>(1), there are the commands <tt
-class="COMMAND">whatis</tt>(1) and <tt class="COMMAND">apropos</tt>(1) available to you,
-whose shared purpose is to make it easier to find information in the man system.</p>
-
-<p>The command <tt class="COMMAND">whatis</tt> gives a very brief description of system
-commands, somewhat in the style of a pocket command reference.</p>
-
-<p>Example:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">whatis whatis</kbd>
-whatis (1) - search the whatis database for complete words
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>The command <tt class="COMMAND">apropos</tt> is used to search for a man page
-containing a given keyword.</p>
-
-<p>Example:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">apropos wav</kbd>
-cdda2wav (1) - a sampling utility that dumps CD audio data into wav sound files
-netwave_cs (4) - Xircom Creditcard Netwave device driver
-oggdec (1) - simple decoder, Ogg Vorbis file to PCM audio file (WAV or RAW)
-wavelan (4) - AT&amp;T GIS WaveLAN ISA device driver
-wavelan_cs (4) - AT&amp;T GIS WaveLAN PCMCIA device driver
-wvlan_cs (4) - Lucent WaveLAN/IEEE 802.11 device driver
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>If you'd like further information on any of these commands, read their man pages for
-the details. ;)</p>
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT2">
-<h2 class="SECT2"><a id="HELP-SYSTEM-DOC" name="HELP-SYSTEM-DOC">2.1.2 The <tt
-class="FILENAME">/usr/doc</tt> Directory</a></h2>
-
-<p>The source for most packages that we build comes with some sort of documentation:
-README files, usage instructions, license files, etc. Any sort of documentation that
-comes with the source is included and installed on your system in the <tt
-class="FILENAME">/usr/doc</tt> directory. Each program will (usually) install its own
-documentation in the order of:</p>
-
-<p><tt class="FILENAME">/usr/doc/<var
-class="REPLACEABLE">$program-$version</var></tt></p>
-
-<p>Where <var class="REPLACEABLE">$program</var> is the name of the program you are
-wanting to read about, and <var class="REPLACEABLE">$version</var> is (obviously) the
-appropriate version of software package installed on your system.</p>
-
-<p>For example, to read the documentation for the command <tt class="COMMAND">man</tt>(1)
-you would want to <tt class="COMMAND">cd</tt> to:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">cd /usr/doc/man-<var
-class="REPLACEABLE">$version</var></kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>If reading the appropriate man page(s) doesn't provide you with enough information, or
-address what you're looking for in particular, the <tt class="FILENAME">/usr/doc</tt>
-directory should be your next stop.</p>
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT2">
-<h2 class="SECT2"><a id="HELP-SYSTEM-HOWTO" name="HELP-SYSTEM-HOWTO">2.1.3 HOWTOs and
-mini-HOWTOs</a></h2>
-
-<p>It is in the truest spirit of the Open Source community that brings us to the
-HOWTO/mini-HOWTO collection. These files are exactly what they sound like - documents and
-guides describing how to do stuff. If you installed the HOWTO collection, the HOWTOs will
-be installed to <tt class="FILENAME">/usr/doc/Linux-HOWTOs</tt> and the mini-HOWTOs to
-<tt class="FILENAME">/usr/doc/Linux-mini-HOWTOs</tt>.</p>
-
-<p>Also included in the same package series is a collection of FAQs, which is an acronym
-which stands for</p>
-
-<div class="INFORMALTABLE"><a id="AEN497" name="AEN497"></a>
-<table border="0" frame="void" class="CALSTABLE">
-<col />
-<tbody>
-<tr>
-<td><span class="emphasis"><i class="EMPHASIS">F</i></span>requently</td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td><span class="emphasis"><i class="EMPHASIS">A</i></span>sked</td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td><span class="emphasis"><i class="EMPHASIS">Q</i></span>uestions</td>
-</tr>
-</tbody>
-</table>
-</div>
-
-<p>These documents are written in a &#8220;Question and answer&#8221; style for
-(surprise) Frequently Asked Questions. The FAQs can often be a very useful place to look
-if you're just looking for a &#8220;Quick Fix&#8221; to something. If you decide to
-install the FAQs during setup, you will find them installed to the <tt
-class="FILENAME">/usr/doc/Linux-FAQs</tt> directory.</p>
-
-<p>These files are well worth reading whenever you're not quite sure how to proceed with
-something. They cover an amazing range of topics, more often than not in a surprisingly
-detailed manner. Good stuff!</p>
-</div>
-</div>
-</div>
-
-<div class="NAVFOOTER">
-<hr align="LEFT" width="100%" />
-<table summary="Footer navigation table" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0"
-cellspacing="0">
-<tr>
-<td width="33%" align="left" valign="top"><a href="introduction-opensource.html"
-accesskey="P">Prev</a></td>
-<td width="34%" align="center" valign="top"><a href="index.html"
-accesskey="H">Home</a></td>
-<td width="33%" align="right" valign="top"><a href="help-online.html"
-accesskey="N">Next</a></td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td width="33%" align="left" valign="top">Open Source and Free Software</td>
-<td width="34%" align="center" valign="top">&nbsp;</td>
-<td width="33%" align="right" valign="top">Online Help</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-</div>
-</body>
-</html>
-