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author Patrick J Volkerding <volkerdi@slackware.com>2018-05-25 23:29:36 +0000
committer Eric Hameleers <alien@slackware.com>2018-06-01 00:36:01 +0200
commit39366733c3fe943363566756e2e152c45a1b3cb2 (patch)
tree228b0735896af90ca78151c9a69aa3efd12c8cae /slackbook/html/basic-network-commands-telnet.html
parentd31c50870d0bee042ce660e445c9294a59a3a65b (diff)
downloadcurrent-14.2.tar.gz
current-14.2.tar.xz
Fri May 25 23:29:36 UTC 201814.2
patches/packages/glibc-zoneinfo-2018e-noarch-2_slack14.2.txz: Rebuilt. Handle removal of US/Pacific-New timezone. If we see that the machine is using this, it will be automatically switched to US/Pacific.
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-<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
- "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
-<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
-<head>
-<meta name="generator" content="HTML Tidy, see www.w3.org" />
-<title>telnet</title>
-<meta name="GENERATOR" content="Modular DocBook HTML Stylesheet Version 1.7" />
-<link rel="HOME" title="Slackware Linux Essentials" href="index.html" />
-<link rel="UP" title="Basic Network Commands" href="basic-network-commands.html" />
-<link rel="PREVIOUS" title="finger" href="basic-network-commands-finger.html" />
-<link rel="NEXT" title="The Secure shell" href="basic-network-commands-ssh.html" />
-<link rel="STYLESHEET" type="text/css" href="docbook.css" />
-<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
-</head>
-<body class="SECT1" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000" link="#0000FF" vlink="#840084"
-alink="#0000FF">
-<div class="NAVHEADER">
-<table summary="Header navigation table" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0"
-cellspacing="0">
-<tr>
-<th colspan="3" align="center">Slackware Linux Essentials</th>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td width="10%" align="left" valign="bottom"><a href="basic-network-commands-finger.html"
-accesskey="P">Prev</a></td>
-<td width="80%" align="center" valign="bottom">Chapter 13 Basic Network Commands</td>
-<td width="10%" align="right" valign="bottom"><a href="basic-network-commands-ssh.html"
-accesskey="N">Next</a></td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<hr align="LEFT" width="100%" />
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT1">
-<h1 class="SECT1"><a id="BASIC-NETWORK-COMMANDS-TELNET"
-name="BASIC-NETWORK-COMMANDS-TELNET">13.5 <tt class="COMMAND">telnet</tt></a></h1>
-
-<p>Someone once stated that <tt class="COMMAND">telnet</tt>(1) was the coolest thing he
-had ever seen on computers. The ability to remotely log in and do stuff on another
-computer is what separates Unix and Unix-like operating systems from other operating
-systems.</p>
-
-<p><tt class="COMMAND">telnet</tt> allows you to log in to a computer, just as if you
-were sitting at the terminal. Once your username and password are verified, you are given
-a shell prompt. From here, you can do anything requiring a text console. Compose email,
-read newsgroups, move files around, and so on. If you are running X and you <tt
-class="COMMAND">telnet</tt> to another machine, you can run X programs on the remote
-computer and display them on yours.</p>
-
-<p>To login to a remote machine, use this syntax:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">telnet &lt;<var
-class="REPLACEABLE">hostname</var>&gt;</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>If the host responds, you will receive a login prompt. Give it your username and
-password. That's it. You are now at a shell. To quit your telnet session, use either the
-<tt class="COMMAND">exit</tt> command or the <tt class="COMMAND">logout</tt> command.</p>
-
-<div class="WARNING">
-<table class="WARNING" width="100%" border="0">
-<tr>
-<td width="25" align="CENTER" valign="TOP"><img src="./imagelib/admon/warning.png"
-hspace="5" alt="Warning" /></td>
-<td align="LEFT" valign="TOP">
-<p><tt class="COMMAND">telnet</tt> does not encrypt the information it sends. Everything
-is sent in plain text, even passwords. It is not advisable to use <tt
-class="COMMAND">telnet</tt> over the Internet. Instead, consider the <tt
-class="COMMAND">Secure Shell</tt>. It encrypts all traffic and is available for free.</p>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT2">
-<h2 class="SECT2"><a id="AEN4593" name="AEN4593">13.5.1 The other use of telnet</a></h2>
-
-<p>Now that we have convinced you not to use the telnet protocol anymore to log into a
-remote machine, we'll show you a couple of useful ways to use <tt
-class="COMMAND">telnet</tt>.</p>
-
-<p>You can also use the <tt class="COMMAND">telnet</tt> command to connect to a host on a
-certain port.</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">telnet &lt;<var
-class="REPLACEABLE">hostname</var>&gt; [port]</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>This can be quite handy when you quickly need to test a certain service, and you need
-full control over the commands, and you need to see what exactly is going on. You can
-interactively test or use an SMTP server, a POP3 server, an HTTP server, etc. this
-way.</p>
-
-<p>In the next figure you'll see how you can <tt class="COMMAND">telnet</tt> to a HTTP
-server on port 80, and get some basic information from it.</p>
-
-<div class="FIGURE"><a id="FIG-BASIC-NETWORK-COMMANDS-TELNET-WEB"
-name="FIG-BASIC-NETWORK-COMMANDS-TELNET-WEB"></a>
-<p><b>Figure 13-1. Telnetting to a webserver</b></p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">telnet store.slackware.com 80</kbd>
-Trying 69.50.233.153...
-Connected to store.slackware.com.
-Escape character is '^]'.
-HEAD / HTTP/1.0
-
-HTTP/1.1 200 OK
-Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2005 20:47:01 GMT
-Server: Apache/1.3.33 (Unix) mod_ssl/2.8.22 OpenSSL/0.9.7d
-Last-Modified: Fri, 18 Apr 2003 10:58:54 GMT
-ETag: "193424-c0-3e9fda6e"
-Accept-Ranges: bytes
-Content-Length: 192
-Connection: close
-Content-Type: text/html
-
-Connection closed by foreign host.
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-</div>
-
-<p>You can do the same for other plain-text protocols, as long as you know what port to
-connect to, and what the commands are.</p>
-</div>
-</div>
-
-<div class="NAVFOOTER">
-<hr align="LEFT" width="100%" />
-<table summary="Footer navigation table" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0"
-cellspacing="0">
-<tr>
-<td width="33%" align="left" valign="top"><a href="basic-network-commands-finger.html"
-accesskey="P">Prev</a></td>
-<td width="34%" align="center" valign="top"><a href="index.html"
-accesskey="H">Home</a></td>
-<td width="33%" align="right" valign="top"><a href="basic-network-commands-ssh.html"
-accesskey="N">Next</a></td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td width="33%" align="left" valign="top"><tt class="COMMAND">finger</tt></td>
-<td width="34%" align="center" valign="top"><a href="basic-network-commands.html"
-accesskey="U">Up</a></td>
-<td width="33%" align="right" valign="top">The Secure shell</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-</div>
-</body>
-</html>
-