summaryrefslogtreecommitdiffstats
path: root/slackbook/html/archive-files-tar.html
diff options
context:
space:
mode:
author Patrick J Volkerding <volkerdi@slackware.com>2018-05-25 23:29:36 +0000
committer Eric Hameleers <alien@slackware.com>2018-05-31 15:18:32 -0700
commit8ff4f2f51a6cf07fc33742ce3bee81328896e49b (patch)
tree4a166b8389404be98a6c098babaa444e2dec8f48 /slackbook/html/archive-files-tar.html
parent76fc4757ac91ac7947a01fb7b53dddf9a78a01d1 (diff)
downloadcurrent-14.1.tar.gz
current-14.1.tar.xz
Fri May 25 23:29:36 UTC 201814.1
patches/packages/glibc-zoneinfo-2018e-noarch-2_slack14.1.txz: Rebuilt. Handle removal of US/Pacific-New timezone. If we see that the machine is using this, it will be automatically switched to US/Pacific.
Diffstat (limited to 'slackbook/html/archive-files-tar.html')
-rw-r--r--slackbook/html/archive-files-tar.html232
1 files changed, 0 insertions, 232 deletions
diff --git a/slackbook/html/archive-files-tar.html b/slackbook/html/archive-files-tar.html
deleted file mode 100644
index b23db4b1..00000000
--- a/slackbook/html/archive-files-tar.html
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,232 +0,0 @@
-<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
- "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
-<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
-<head>
-<meta name="generator" content="HTML Tidy, see www.w3.org" />
-<title>tar</title>
-<meta name="GENERATOR" content="Modular DocBook HTML Stylesheet Version 1.7" />
-<link rel="HOME" title="Slackware Linux Essentials" href="index.html" />
-<link rel="UP" title="Archive Files" href="archive-files.html" />
-<link rel="PREVIOUS" title="bzip2" href="archive-files-bzip2.html" />
-<link rel="NEXT" title="zip" href="archive-files-zip.html" />
-<link rel="STYLESHEET" type="text/css" href="docbook.css" />
-<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
-</head>
-<body class="SECT1" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000" link="#0000FF" vlink="#840084"
-alink="#0000FF">
-<div class="NAVHEADER">
-<table summary="Header navigation table" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0"
-cellspacing="0">
-<tr>
-<th colspan="3" align="center">Slackware Linux Essentials</th>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td width="10%" align="left" valign="bottom"><a href="archive-files-bzip2.html"
-accesskey="P">Prev</a></td>
-<td width="80%" align="center" valign="bottom">Chapter 15 Archive Files</td>
-<td width="10%" align="right" valign="bottom"><a href="archive-files-zip.html"
-accesskey="N">Next</a></td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<hr align="LEFT" width="100%" />
-</div>
-
-<div class="SECT1">
-<h1 class="SECT1"><a id="ARCHIVE-FILES-TAR" name="ARCHIVE-FILES-TAR">15.3 <tt
-class="COMMAND">tar</tt></a></h1>
-
-<p><tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt>(1) is the GNU tape archiver. It takes several files or
-directories and creates one large file. This allows you to compress an entire directory
-tree, which is impossible by just using <tt class="COMMAND">gzip</tt> or <tt
-class="COMMAND">bzip2</tt>. <tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt> has many command line options,
-which are explained in its man page. This section will just cover the most common uses of
-<tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt>.</p>
-
-<p>The most common use for <tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt> is to decompress and unarchive a
-package that you've downloaded from a web site or ftp site. Most files will come with a
-<tt class="FILENAME">.tar.gz</tt> extension. This is commonly known as a
-&#8220;tarball&#8221;. It means that several files were archived using <tt
-class="COMMAND">tar</tt> and then compressed using <tt class="COMMAND">gzip</tt>. You
-might also see this listed as a <tt class="FILENAME">.tar.Z</tt> file. It means the same
-thing, but this is usually encountered on older Unix systems.</p>
-
-<p>Alternatively, you might find a <tt class="FILENAME">.tar.bz2</tt> file somewhere.
-Kernel source is distributed as such because it is a smaller download. As you might have
-guessed, this is several files archived with <tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt> and then
-bzipped.</p>
-
-<p>You can get to all the files in this archive by making use of <tt
-class="COMMAND">tar</tt> and some command line arguments. Unarchiving a tarball makes use
-of the <var class="OPTION">-z</var> flag, which means to first run the file through <tt
-class="COMMAND">gunzip</tt> and decompress it. The most common way to decompress a
-tarball is like so:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">tar -xvzf filename.tar.gz</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>That's quite a few options. So what do they all mean? The <var class="OPTION">-x</var>
-means to extract. This is important, as it tells <tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt> exactly
-what to do with the input file. In this case, we'll be splitting it back up into all the
-files that it came from. <var class="OPTION">-v</var> means to be verbose. This will list
-all the files that are being unarchived. It is perfectly acceptable to leave this option
-off, if somewhat boring. Alternatively, you could use <var class="OPTION">-vv</var> to be
-very verbose and list even more information about each file being unarchived. The <var
-class="OPTION">-z</var> option tells <tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt> to run <tt
-class="FILENAME">filename.tar.gz</tt> through <tt class="COMMAND">gunzip</tt> first. And
-finally, the <var class="OPTION">-f</var> option tells <tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt> that
-the next string on the command line is the file to operate on.</p>
-
-<p>There are a few other ways to write this same command. On older systems lacking a
-decent copy of GNU <tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt>, you might see it written like so:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd
-class="USERINPUT">gunzip filename.tar.gz | tar -xvf -</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>This command line will uncompress the file and send the output to <tt
-class="COMMAND">tar</tt>. Since <tt class="COMMAND">gzip</tt> will write its output to
-standard out if told to do so, this command will write the decompressed file to standard
-out. The pipe then sends it to <tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt> for unarchiving. The
-&#8220;-&#8221; means to operate on standard input. It will unarchive the stream of data
-that it gets from <tt class="COMMAND">gzip</tt> and write that to the disk.</p>
-
-<p>Another way to write the first command line is to leave off the dash before the
-options, like so:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">tar xvzf filename.tar.gz</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>You might also encounter a bzipped archive. The version of <tt
-class="COMMAND">tar</tt> that comes with Slackware Linux can handle these the same as
-gzipped archives. Instead of the <var class="OPTION">-z</var> command line option, you'd
-use <var class="OPTION">-j</var>:</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">tar -xvjf filename.tar.bz2</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>It is important to note that <tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt> will place the unarchived
-files in the current directory. So, if you had an archive in <tt
-class="FILENAME">/tmp</tt> that you wanted to decompress into your home directory, there
-are a few options. First, the archive could be moved into your home directory and then
-run through <tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt>. Second, you could specify the path to the
-archive file on the command line. Third, you can use the <var class="OPTION">-C</var>
-option to &#8220;explode&#8221; the tarball in a specified directory.</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">cd $HOME</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">cp /tmp/filename.tar.gz .</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">tar -xvzf filename.tar.gz</kbd>
-
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">cd $HOME</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">tar -xvzf /tmp/filename.tar.gz</kbd>
-
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">cd /</kbd>
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd
-class="USERINPUT">tar -xvzf /tmp/filename.tar.gz -C $HOME</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>All the above statements are equivalent. In each case, the archive is unpacked inside
-your home directory and the original uncompressed archive is left in place.</p>
-
-<p>So what good is being able to uncompress these archives if you can't make them? Well,
-<tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt> handles that too. In most cases it's as easy as removing the
-&#8220;<var class="OPTION">-x</var>&#8221; option and replacing it with the &#8220;<var
-class="OPTION">-c</var>&#8221; option.</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd class="USERINPUT">tar -cvzf filename.tar.gz .</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>In this command line, the <var class="OPTION">-c</var> option tells <tt
-class="COMMAND">tar</tt> to create an archive, while the <var class="OPTION">-z</var>
-option runs the resulting archive file through <tt class="COMMAND">gzip</tt> to compress
-it. <tt class="FILENAME">filename.tar.gz</tt> is the file that you want to create.</p>
-
-<p>Specifying the &#8220;<var class="OPTION">-f</var>&#8221; option isn't always
-necessary, but is typically good practice anyway. Without it, <tt
-class="COMMAND">tar</tt> writes to standard output, which is usually desired for piping
-<tt class="COMMAND">tar</tt>'s output to another program, like so.</p>
-
-<table border="0" bgcolor="#E0E0E0" width="100%">
-<tr>
-<td>
-<pre class="SCREEN">
-<samp class="PROMPT">%</samp> <kbd
-class="USERINPUT">tar -cv filename.tar . | gpg --encrypt</kbd>
-</pre>
-</td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-
-<p>That command creates an non-compressed tar archive of the current directory, pipes the
-tarball through <tt class="COMMAND">gpg</tt> which encrypts and compresses the tarball,
-making it realistically impossible to read by anyone other than the person knowing the
-secret key.</p>
-</div>
-
-<div class="NAVFOOTER">
-<hr align="LEFT" width="100%" />
-<table summary="Footer navigation table" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0"
-cellspacing="0">
-<tr>
-<td width="33%" align="left" valign="top"><a href="archive-files-bzip2.html"
-accesskey="P">Prev</a></td>
-<td width="34%" align="center" valign="top"><a href="index.html"
-accesskey="H">Home</a></td>
-<td width="33%" align="right" valign="top"><a href="archive-files-zip.html"
-accesskey="N">Next</a></td>
-</tr>
-
-<tr>
-<td width="33%" align="left" valign="top"><tt class="COMMAND">bzip2</tt></td>
-<td width="34%" align="center" valign="top"><a href="archive-files.html"
-accesskey="U">Up</a></td>
-<td width="33%" align="right" valign="top"><tt class="COMMAND">zip</tt></td>
-</tr>
-</table>
-</div>
-</body>
-</html>
-