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author Patrick J Volkerding <volkerdi@slackware.com>2010-05-19 08:58:23 +0000
committer Eric Hameleers <alien@slackware.com>2018-05-31 22:43:05 +0200
commitb76270bf9e6dd375e495fec92140a79a79415d27 (patch)
tree3dbed78b2279bf9f14207a16dc634b90995cbd40 /Slackware-HOWTO
parent5a12e7c134274dba706667107d10d231517d3e05 (diff)
downloadcurrent-b76270bf9e6dd375e495fec92140a79a79415d27.tar.gz
current-b76270bf9e6dd375e495fec92140a79a79415d27.tar.xz
Slackware 13.1slackware-13.1
Wed May 19 08:58:23 UTC 2010 Slackware 13.1 x86_64 stable is released! Lots of thanks are due -- see the RELEASE_NOTES and the rest of the ChangeLog for credits. The ISOs are on their way to replication, a 6 CD-ROM 32-bit set and a dual-sided 32-bit/64-bit x86/x86_64 DVD. We are taking pre-orders now at store.slackware.com, and offering a discount if you sign up for a subscription. Consider picking up a copy to help support the project. Thanks again to the Slackware community for testing, contributing, and generally holding us to a high level of quality. :-) Enjoy!
Diffstat (limited to 'Slackware-HOWTO')
-rw-r--r--Slackware-HOWTO135
1 files changed, 83 insertions, 52 deletions
diff --git a/Slackware-HOWTO b/Slackware-HOWTO
index 1bbfe2f9..98b8bdbc 100644
--- a/Slackware-HOWTO
+++ b/Slackware-HOWTO
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
Slackware Linux CD-ROM Installation HOWTO
Patrick Volkerding <volkerdi@slackware.com>
-v13.0, 2009-08-25
+v13.1, 2010-05-18
This document covers installation of the Slackware(R) distribution of the
Linux operating system from the Slackware CD-ROM.
@@ -107,8 +107,8 @@ might still be able to install, but if so don't expect the best possible
experience.
You also will need some disk space to install Slackware. For a complete
-installation, you'll probably want to devote a 6GB *or larger* partition
-completely to Slackware (you'll need almost 5GB for a full default
+installation, you'll probably want to devote a 10GB *or larger* partition
+completely to Slackware (you'll need almost 6GB for a full default
installation, and then you'll want extra space when you're done).
If you haven't installed Slackware before, you may have to experiment.
If you've got the drive space, more is going to be better than not enough.
@@ -140,35 +140,35 @@ only has the A series installed. Here's an overview of the software
categories available for installation, along with the (approximate) amount
of drive space needed to install the entire set:
- A The base Slackware system. (270 MB)
+ A The base Slackware system. (310 MB)
- AP Linux applications. (270 MB)
+ AP Linux applications. (290 MB)
- D Program development tools. (575 MB)
+ D Program development tools. (600 MB)
- E GNU Emacs. (80 MB)
+ E GNU Emacs. (100 MB)
F FAQs and HOWTOs for common tasks. (35 MB)
- K Linux 2.6.29.6 kernel source. (380 MB)
+ K Linux 2.6.33.4 kernel source. (445 MB)
- KDE The K Desktop Environment and applications. (800 MB)
+ KDE The KDE desktop environment and applications. (925 MB)
- KDEI Language support for the K Desktop Environment. (730 MB)
+ KDEI Language support for KDE. (800 MB)
- L System libraries. (840 MB)
+ L System libraries. (950 MB)
- N Networking applications and utilities. (275 MB)
+ N Networking applications and utilities. (325 MB)
T TeX typesetting language. (285 MB)
TCL Tcl/Tk/TclX scripting languages and tools. (15 MB)
- X X Window System graphical user interface. (290 MB)
+ X X Window System graphical user interface. (300 MB)
- XAP Applications for the X Window System. (485 MB)
+ XAP Applications for the X Window System. (490 MB)
- Y Classic text-based BSD games. (5 MB)
+ Y Classic text-based BSD games. (6 MB)
If you have the disk space, we encourage you to do a full installation for
best results. Otherwise, remember that you must install the A set. You
@@ -248,24 +248,34 @@ your machine's CD-ROM drive and reboot to load the disc. You'll get an
initial information screen and a prompt (called the "boot:" prompt) at the
bottom of the screen. This is where you'll enter the name of the kernel
that you want to boot with. With most systems you'll want to use the
-default kernel, called huge.s.
+default kernel, called hugesmp.s. Even on a machine with only a single
+one-core processor, it is recommended to use this kernel if your machine
+can run it. Otherwise use the huge.s kernel, which should support any
+486 or better.
-To boot the huge.s kernel, just enter huge.s on the boot prompt:
+To boot the hugesmp.s kernel, just enter hugesmp.s on the boot prompt:
-boot: huge.s
+boot: hugesmp.s
-(actually, since the huge.s kernel is the default, you could have just
-hit ENTER and the machine would go ahead and load the huge.s kernel
+(actually, since the hugesmp.s kernel is the default, you could have just
+hit ENTER and the machine would go ahead and load the hugesmp.s kernel
for you)
+If you've got some non-standard hardware in your machine (or if hugesmp.s
+doesn't work, and you're beginning to suspect you need a different
+kernel), then you'll have to try huge.s. If, for some reason, that still
+will not boot and you know that your hardware should be supported by the
+2.6.33.4 kernel, contact volkerdi at slackware dot com and I will see
+what I can do.
+
These are the kernels shipped in Slackware:
-huge.s This is the default installation kernel. If possible,
+hugesmp.s This is the default installation kernel. If possible,
you can save a bit of RAM later (and some ugly warnings at
boot time or when trying to load modules when the driver is
already built-in) by switching to a generic kernel. In this
- case that would be the generic kernel, which is similar but
+ case that would be gensmp.s, which is a similar kernel but
without filesystems and many of the less common drive
controllers built in. To support these (at the very least
your root filesystem), an initrd (actually an initramfs)
@@ -282,16 +292,31 @@ huge.s This is the default installation kernel. If possible,
purposes. It's not impossible though -- think tar to/from a
device such as a USB stick, or leveraging ROMFS.
-speakup.s This is like the huge.s but has support for Speakup and all
- the SCSI, RAID, LVM, and other features of huge.s. There is
- no corresponding generic kernel for speakup.s, but the vanilla
- linux sources may be patched with the speakup sources in
- source/k (this will probably work on any recent kernel).
- After that, whatever customizations are needed should be
- easily adjusted. The speakup.s kernel is used to support
- hardware speech synthesizers as well as software one like
- festival (though these require additional programs that are
- not yet shipped with Slackware).
+gensmp.s The trimmed down, more modular version of hugesmp.s. This
+ can be switched to, after setting up an initrd and
+ reinstalling LILO. It is packaged as a .txz, and can be
+ found on the installed system as:
+ /boot/vmlinuz-generic-smp-2.6.33.4-smp
+
+huge.s This is the 486-compatible single processor version of the
+ hugesmp.s kernel. Try this if hugesmp.s does not work on
+ your machine.
+
+generic.s The trimmed down, more modular version of huge.s. Found on
+ the system as:
+ /boot/vmlinuz-generic-2.6.33.4
+ This also requires using an initrd.
+
+speakup.s This is like the huge.s (486 compatible loaded kernel), but
+ has support for Speakup and all the SCSI, RAID, LVM, and other
+ features of huge.s. There is no corresponding generic kernel
+ for speakup.s, but the vanilla linux sources may be patched
+ with the speakup sources in source/k (this will probably work
+ on any recent kernel). After that, whatever customizations are
+ needed should be easily adjusted. The speakup.s kernel is
+ used to support hardware speech synthesizers as well as
+ software one like festival (though these require additional
+ programs that are not yet shipped with Slackware).
For more information about speakup and its drivers check out:
http://www.linux-speakup.org.
@@ -313,6 +338,14 @@ speakup.s This is like the huge.s but has support for Speakup and all
usually seen on Linux.
+Note that if you use the huge (non-SMP kernel) and plan to compile any
+third party kernel modules, you may need to apply the kernel patch in
+/extra/linux-2.6... or, you could just cd to the kernel sources, run
+"make menuconfig", make sure that SMP (and the -smp suffix) are turned
+off, and recompile the kernel with "make". But, that's for later --
+after the install.
+
+
Once you've entered your kernel choice and hit ENTER, the kernel and
install program will load from the DVD or CD-ROM, and you'll arrive at
the Linux login prompt. (You're running Linux now. Congratulations! :-)
@@ -337,10 +370,8 @@ use the Linux version of fdisk.
To need to partition a hard drive, you need to specify the
name of the device when you start fdisk. For example:
-fdisk /dev/hda (Repartition the first IDE hard drive)
-fdisk /dev/hdb (Repartition the second IDE hard drive)
-fdisk /dev/sda (Repartition the first SCSI hard drive)
-fdisk /dev/sdb (Repartition the second SCSI hard drive)
+fdisk /dev/sda (Repartition the first hard drive)
+fdisk /dev/sdb (Repartition the second hard drive)
NOTE: If you prefer, you may also try a newer menu-driven version
of Linux fdisk called 'cfdisk'. Rumor has it that MOST people do
@@ -352,12 +383,12 @@ at your existing partition table with the 'p' command:
Command (m for help): p
-Disk /dev/hda: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
+Disk /dev/sda: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 4865 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
-/dev/hda1 * 1 2423 19462716 c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
+/dev/sda1 * 1 2423 19462716 c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
Here we can see that there is one DOS partition on the drive already,
@@ -434,14 +465,14 @@ you're satisfied with them:
Command (m for help): p
-Disk /dev/hda: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
+Disk /dev/sda: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 4865 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
-/dev/hda1 1 2423 19462716+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
-/dev/hda2 2424 4700 18720732 83 Linux
-/dev/hda3 4701 4865 1317332 82 Linux swap
+/dev/sda1 1 2423 19462716+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
+/dev/sda2 2424 4700 18720732 83 Linux
+/dev/sda3 4701 4865 1317332 82 Linux swap
This looks good, so we'll use the "w" command to write the data out to the
drive's partition table. If you want to exit without updating the
@@ -504,14 +535,14 @@ program to list your partitions like this:
# fdisk -l
- Disk /dev/hda: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
+ Disk /dev/sda: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 4865 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
- /dev/hda1 1 2423 19462716+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
- /dev/hda2 2424 4700 18720732 83 Linux
- /dev/hda3 4701 4865 1317332 82 Linux
+ /dev/sda1 1 2423 19462716+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
+ /dev/sda2 2424 4700 18720732 83 Linux
+ /dev/sda3 4701 4865 1317332 82 Linux
In this case, if /dev/sda3 is meant to be a Linux swap partition, you'll
need to start fdisk on drive /dev/sda:
@@ -581,8 +612,8 @@ you'd like to put the partition in your directory tree.
MS-DOS/Windows assigns a letter such as A:, B:, C:, etc, to each device.
Unlike DOS, Linux makes your devices visible somewhere under the root
-directory (/). You might have /dev/hda1 for your root partition (/) and
-put /dev/hda2 somewhere underneath it, such as under your /home directory.
+directory (/). You might have /dev/sda1 for your root partition (/) and
+put /dev/sda2 somewhere underneath it, such as under your /home directory.
When prompted for a mount location, just enter a directory such as /home,
and hit enter. As you format each additional partition and place it in
the filesystem tree, you'll be returned to the partition selection menu.
@@ -607,7 +638,7 @@ or pick manually from a list. (unless you're trying to show off to your
friends, go ahead and let setup scan for the CD-ROM drive automatically).
Setup will then try to access the Slackware CD-ROM. If this is
successful, setup will tell you that it found and mounted a CD-ROM on a
-Linux device such as /dev/hdc. If the CD-ROM was successful found, you
+Linux device such as /dev/sr0. If the CD-ROM was successful found, you
may skip ahead to the SELECT section below, otherwise read on for some
CD-ROM troubleshooting tips.
@@ -975,12 +1006,12 @@ darkstar login:
Log into the new system as "root".
- Welcome to Linux 2.6.29.6.
+ Welcome to Linux 2.6.33.4.
darkstar login: root
- Last login: Sun Aug 23 18:33:01 -0500 2009 on tty3.
+ Last login: Tue May 18 15:36:23 2010 on tty3.
- Linux 2.6.29.6.
+ Linux 2.6.33.4.
You have new mail.
darkstar: ~#