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author Patrick J Volkerding <volkerdi@slackware.com>2013-11-04 17:08:47 +0000
committer Eric Hameleers <alien@slackware.com>2018-05-31 22:57:36 +0200
commit76fc4757ac91ac7947a01fb7b53dddf9a78a01d1 (patch)
tree9b98e6e193c7870cb27ac861394c1c4592850922 /Slackware-HOWTO
parent9664bee729d487bcc0a0bc35859f8e13d5421c75 (diff)
downloadcurrent-76fc4757ac91ac7947a01fb7b53dddf9a78a01d1.tar.gz
current-76fc4757ac91ac7947a01fb7b53dddf9a78a01d1.tar.xz
Slackware 14.1slackware-14.1
Mon Nov 4 17:08:47 UTC 2013 Slackware 14.1 x86_64 stable is released! It's been another interesting release cycle here at Slackware bringing new features like support for UEFI machines, updated compilers and development tools, the switch from MySQL to MariaDB, and many more improvements throughout the system. Thanks to the team, the upstream developers, the dedicated Slackware community, and everyone else who pitched in to help make this release a reality. The ISOs are off to be replicated, a 6 CD-ROM 32-bit set and a dual-sided 32-bit/64-bit x86/x86_64 DVD. Please consider supporting the Slackware project by picking up a copy from store.slackware.com. We're taking pre-orders now, and offer a discount if you sign up for a subscription. Have fun! :-)
Diffstat (limited to 'Slackware-HOWTO')
-rw-r--r--Slackware-HOWTO62
1 files changed, 32 insertions, 30 deletions
diff --git a/Slackware-HOWTO b/Slackware-HOWTO
index 98b8bdbc..87de12b7 100644
--- a/Slackware-HOWTO
+++ b/Slackware-HOWTO
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
Slackware Linux CD-ROM Installation HOWTO
Patrick Volkerding <volkerdi@slackware.com>
-v13.1, 2010-05-18
+v14.1, 2012-10-12
This document covers installation of the Slackware(R) distribution of the
Linux operating system from the Slackware CD-ROM.
@@ -81,6 +81,10 @@ If you're new to Slackware, you'll be happy to know there is a *lot* of
documentation and help available both on the Internet and on the CD-ROM
itself.
+The Slackware documentation wiki has a lot of information:
+
+ http://docs.slackware.com
+
A great source of general documentation about Linux is the Linux
Documentation Project, online at: http://tldp.org/
@@ -108,7 +112,7 @@ experience.
You also will need some disk space to install Slackware. For a complete
installation, you'll probably want to devote a 10GB *or larger* partition
-completely to Slackware (you'll need almost 6GB for a full default
+completely to Slackware (you'll need almost 8GB for a full default
installation, and then you'll want extra space when you're done).
If you haven't installed Slackware before, you may have to experiment.
If you've got the drive space, more is going to be better than not enough.
@@ -140,41 +144,43 @@ only has the A series installed. Here's an overview of the software
categories available for installation, along with the (approximate) amount
of drive space needed to install the entire set:
- A The base Slackware system. (310 MB)
+ A The base Slackware system. (405 MB)
- AP Linux applications. (290 MB)
+ AP Linux applications. (445 MB)
- D Program development tools. (600 MB)
+ D Program development tools. (1.1 GB)
- E GNU Emacs. (100 MB)
+ E GNU Emacs. (117 MB)
- F FAQs and HOWTOs for common tasks. (35 MB)
+ F FAQs and HOWTOs for common tasks. (33 MB)
- K Linux 2.6.33.4 kernel source. (445 MB)
+ K Linux 3.10.17 kernel source. (582 MB)
- KDE The KDE desktop environment and applications. (925 MB)
+ KDE The KDE desktop environment and applications. (1.4 GB)
- KDEI Language support for KDE. (800 MB)
+ KDEI Language support for KDE. (1 GB)
- L System libraries. (950 MB)
+ L System libraries. (1.3 GB)
- N Networking applications and utilities. (325 MB)
+ N Networking applications and utilities. (340 MB)
- T TeX typesetting language. (285 MB)
+ T TeX typesetting language. (291 MB)
- TCL Tcl/Tk/TclX scripting languages and tools. (15 MB)
+ TCL Tcl/Tk/TclX scripting languages and tools. (19 MB)
- X X Window System graphical user interface. (300 MB)
+ X X Window System graphical user interface. (389 MB)
- XAP Applications for the X Window System. (490 MB)
+ XAP Applications for the X Window System. (571 MB)
+
+ XFCE The XFCE desktop environment and applications. (72 MB)
Y Classic text-based BSD games. (6 MB)
If you have the disk space, we encourage you to do a full installation for
best results. Otherwise, remember that you must install the A set. You
probably also want to install the AP, D, L, and N series, as well as the KDE,
-X, and XAP sets if you wish to run the X Window System. The Y series is fun,
-but not required.
+X, XAP, and XFCE sets if you wish to run the X Window System. The Y series is
+fun, but not required.
3.1 Preparing a Partition for Slackware
@@ -183,6 +189,9 @@ If you plan to install Slackware onto its own hard drive partition
(this offers optimal performance), then you'll need to prepare one or
more partitions for it.
+NOTE: For information on partitioning UEFI systems, please see the
+README_UEFI.TXT file.
+
A partition is a section of a hard drive that has been set aside for
use by an operating system. You can have up to four primary
partitions on a single hard drive. If you need more than that, you
@@ -265,7 +274,7 @@ If you've got some non-standard hardware in your machine (or if hugesmp.s
doesn't work, and you're beginning to suspect you need a different
kernel), then you'll have to try huge.s. If, for some reason, that still
will not boot and you know that your hardware should be supported by the
-2.6.33.4 kernel, contact volkerdi at slackware dot com and I will see
+3.10.17 kernel, contact volkerdi at slackware dot com and I will see
what I can do.
@@ -307,16 +316,9 @@ generic.s The trimmed down, more modular version of huge.s. Found on
/boot/vmlinuz-generic-2.6.33.4
This also requires using an initrd.
-speakup.s This is like the huge.s (486 compatible loaded kernel), but
- has support for Speakup and all the SCSI, RAID, LVM, and other
- features of huge.s. There is no corresponding generic kernel
- for speakup.s, but the vanilla linux sources may be patched
- with the speakup sources in source/k (this will probably work
- on any recent kernel). After that, whatever customizations are
- needed should be easily adjusted. The speakup.s kernel is
- used to support hardware speech synthesizers as well as
- software one like festival (though these require additional
- programs that are not yet shipped with Slackware).
+speakup.s This used to be a separate kernel patched with the Speakup
+ voice synth software, but this is now part of the regular
+ kernels.
For more information about speakup and its drivers check out:
http://www.linux-speakup.org.
@@ -340,7 +342,7 @@ speakup.s This is like the huge.s (486 compatible loaded kernel), but
Note that if you use the huge (non-SMP kernel) and plan to compile any
third party kernel modules, you may need to apply the kernel patch in
-/extra/linux-2.6... or, you could just cd to the kernel sources, run
+/extra/linux-3.10... or, you could just cd to the kernel sources, run
"make menuconfig", make sure that SMP (and the -smp suffix) are turned
off, and recompile the kernel with "make". But, that's for later --
after the install.